Monthly Archives: August 2014

More About Inlay

I’m reading everything I can find about inlay these days, and thinking about doing a simple piece to get a feel for the process soon.

First, for inspiration, take a look at the detail on this inlaid Koi from a tabletop by Hudson River Inlay:

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Spectacular inlaid Koi by Hudson River Inlay

I also found a great “instructibles” tutorial that covers the basic steps for inlaying a design cut from shell: http://www.instructables.com/id/Handcut-inlay/?ALLSTEPS

Guitar head inlaid by "Jimmi"

Guitar head inlaid by “Jimmi”

And I’ve started/finished watching these two Larry Robinson inlay videos.

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Basic and Intermediate Inlay Techniques by Larry Robinson

The first video goes through the process of inlaying a butterfly cut from White Pearl, Gold Lip Pearl and Abalone shells from design through completion.  There were some great tips in the video.  These were produced originally as VHS tapes, and the video quality is not quite as nice as more recently produced “how-to” DVDs, but that isn’t really a problem.

Larry goes over the different kinds of inlay materials available, and I was really surprised at the size of the shells that the Pearl and Abalone comes from.  I’d always imagined small shells, like 3″ to 4″ across, but the Pearl shell was easily a foot wide.  I tried to sang some screenshots from the video, but didn’t get anything usable.

The design process involves tracing several times, refinance the layout with each step.  It’s an interesting approach, with the first tracing from a reference book the design looks a little crude, then lines are slightly uneven and the design is unbalanced.  After tracing from that copy onto a new design the effect is greatly improved.  I’ll have to try that.

The biggest challenge in my view is sawing out the parts.  He uses a fret saw with a tiny jewelers blade and saws out these impossibly tiny, delicate parts.  The guitar peg head below is an example, each of those vines, including the thin delicate ones leading up to the flower in the middle, were sawn out by hand and fit into a recess in the wood.

Inlay work by Larry Robinson in Pearl, Abalone, Gold

Inlay work by Larry Robinson in Pearl, Abalone, Gold

I haven’t watched the second DVD yet, but it is supposed to cover more advanced techniques, including engraving the inlaid material.

I’m not particularly interested in doing this sort of elaborate inlay, my goal is to be able to do more traditional furniture inlays as seen on Arts & Crafts furniture, and especially the bolection style used on Greene & Greene furniture.  But any little tidbits of information on technique I’m filing away.  One day soon I’m going to try this myself.

Detail of an inlaid desk done for the Pratt house

Detail of an inlaid desk done for the Pratt house

 

 

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Thorsen Cabinet Finish I

Yesterday I started applying the finish to the Thorsen cabinet.

It seems like ages ago that I started this project, but I have to remember that in the course of building it I started (and completed) the Thorsen side table.  Plus I also designed an Arts & Crafts bookcase that I intended to build next (as soon as I can source the wide quarter sawn oak for it I will start it!) and almost by accident I decided to design a the Blacker House Serving Table, which I might actually build next.  Part of my interest in the Blacker table is, of course, learning about inlay — which is my current fascination.

So it was with equal parts excitement and trepidation that I started layering on the finish yesterday.  I’m excited to be so close to completing this project finally, but I’m worried that I’ve forgotten to do something in the interim.  I think I’ve made al;l the parts — case, back, door, skirt front, glass retaining strips…check.  Everything is sanded to 320, wiped with water to raise the grain, scoff sanded and cleaned to remove dust.

So I mixed the Trans-Tint Reddish-Brown water dye, and assembled my tools.

Dye mixed and ready to go

Dye mixed and ready to go

I set up my finishing stands (I made these folding stands 25+ years ago from electrical conduit to hold car parts I was painting) and did a final clean up pass on the parts.

Door ready for dye

Door ready for dye

Cabinet ready for dye

Cabinet ready for dye

I used a combination of the spray bottle and the brush to get a coat of dye on.  I did one “table” of parts at a time.  First I sprayed the  cabinet and the shelf and glass strips that were on the same stand.  I made sure I had dye everywhere and that it a good five minutes to soak in, then I wiped it down with rags.  Then I moved to the next set of parts.  Once all the parts had been dyed and dried, I left them to air dry for an hour.

Main cabinet after dying

Main cabinet after dying

Door after dying

Door after dying

After I was sure that the water based dye had completely dried I went over the parts with a scotchbrite pad to remove any little fuzzies on the surface, and blew them off to get a clean surface.  Then I slathered on plain Boiled Linseed Oil and let that soak for an hour.  In the sun the parts look very red, back inside the shop they look dark brown, the actual color when finished and in the house is in between these two extremes.

Cabinet with a heavy coat of linseed oil soaking in

Cabinet with a heavy coat of linseed oil soaking in

Door soaking up oil

Door soaking up oil

I kept an eye on the parts while they were coated in oil to make sure they didn’t dry out in spots.  After an hour I wiped them down and removed all traces of oil on the surface.  I used an air nozzle to blow out the joints and corners to make sure there wouldn’t be any drips later.  Then everything went back into the shop to dry.

Door after dye and oil

Door after dye and oil

Shelf and cabinet back after dye and oil

Shelf and cabinet back after dye and oil

Cabinet after dye and oil

Cabinet after dye and oil

You can see how mush darker the finish looks in the shop.  I want to wait at least 24 hours after the oil before spraying the Garnet shellac — and at least 24 hours after that before rubbing the shellac out with colored wax.

Today I’m going to do the stained glass and a couple of errands — I bought a new bandsaw for my wood shop and I need to haul the crate to the recycling center, and I plan to pick up some more Sapele for the Blacker table.  Ideally I’d get the glass done today, but it might get too hot later to work outside and I have to do the errands in the morning while those places are open.  If it’s too hot this afternoon I’ll have to watch the inlay video I got, and that certainly won’t be a hardship!

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Blacker Serving Table Design Completed

I’ve reached a state of equilibrium with the design for my semi-reproduction of this Greene & Greene serving table from the Blacker house.  Which almost guarantees that I’ll think of three changes I want to make before I finish writing the blog post…

Blacker house serving table - Final Design?

Blacker house serving table – Final Design?

There were some missing details that I needed to fill in, including joinery and embellishments.  I think I have those done now, but I’d appreciate feedback on goth the aesthetics and the functionals.  In terms of the latter, I settled on twin 2″ wide tenons on the skirts with a wide stub tenon across the end of the skirt to prevent cupping.  The longer tenons will hold the base together, the stub tenon probably don’t be glued but is there just to prevent cupping on the wide skirts.  The tenons are offset between the sides so that the deep mortises don’t intersect.  I can think of other ways to do this joint, so I’m curious if anyone sees a problem.

Exploded view of joinery details in the "final" design

Exploded view of joinery details in the “final” design

I added in the joinery details on the table top as well.  A wide stub tenon and four 2 1/2″ wide longer tenons.  I’ll screw through the breadboard end caps into the end of the long tenons.  I added rectangular Ebony caps to indicate these locations on the breadboard ends, although I might want them a tiny bit longer.  Also new in this “final” version are the Ebony applies that join the top and breadboard end.

I had mentioned that the transition in the cloud lifts was more gradual in mine than in the original.  I tweaked it in my design to make it a bit more abrupt like the original, and I like it better.  This is a detail I might play with a little in the future.  I didn’t update the inlay design in the top, but I probably will eventually — ok there are the three changes I predicted that I’d find in talking about my final design.

I added in the inlay design on the legs — I’m pretty happy with this part.  I think it adds a lot to the style of the table.  I feel like I got the “rhythm” of the design right, although it’s not identical to the original

Details of the inlay design for the legs

Details of the inlay design for the legs

Overall I think I’ve captured the scale and feel of the original design, although it’s different in some of the details.  The inlay is a little bit of a concern, but I think if I do a practice piece or two I  can probably figure it out.  I took today off work, so I’ll be starting the finish on the Thorsen cabinet.  Maybe during drying time I’ll run down to Watsonville and pico up a couple of wide boards of Sapele for the skirts and top of this table…

 

 

 

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Blacker Table Design

I want to thank John Vernier for his comments.  John always has valuable input and has shared some great insights on both history and techniques.  Yesterday I mentioned that there were two versions of the table — I was alluding to two different sizes that were produced, but John clarified that there were also two of the smaller version of this table produced for the Blacker house originally:

You are right that there are two versions of the table. There are two identical serving tables, the one in Chicago and the other in the Oakland Museum (you should pop over and take a look). There is also a breakfast table which is larger, and scaled so that it can butt up to the main dining table and act as an extension. I think that one is in private hands but I’ll get back to you if I find out differently.

The two identical smaller tables were both originally in the Blacker dining room. Jim Ipekjian’s copies are there now, against one long wall, opposite the sideboard. I think they have silver tea service displayed on them, and they really are just auxiliary serving tables. The breakfast table was in a separate room which is connected to the main dining room by a set of double-fold french doors, so that the space can be opened up into one large room, and the breakfast table scooted up to the main dining table. The dining table also has extension leaves which mount on each end, so the resulting table would be extremely long, just the thing for 32 person dinners. On the whole it really is the largest and most elaborate dining set the Greenes designed.

When Nellie Blacker died in 1947, the people who bought the house sold off the furniture in basically one big yard sale. One of the neighboring families bought most of it, and kept it for many years. When interest in Greene and Greene began to pick up, they realized the importance of their collection and sold it off slowly over a couple of decades (I don’t know if this is still going on, a lot came to market in the 70s and 80s). Many different museums have bought a piece or two as representative examples of G&G work, so it is dispersed all over the place.

Thanks John!  I would go see the one in the Oakland museum, but it’s not on display.  I wonder if they’d let me see it anyway?  I may actually have an “in” there…I’ll investigate that.

For comparison, here are the two different sizes of the Blacker table.  First off, here is the version that I’m thinking of building.  The chair in the picture puts the scale of the “smaller” table into perspective, it’s still a fairly large table at about 36″ wide by  22 1/8″ deep by 29 7/8″ tall  .  The chair would be an interesting project too, although that scares me.  Chairs in general, but G&G chairs with tapered trapezoidal curved legs and angled mortises and so forth. If you look closely you can see some subtle “stepping” on the lower stretchers of the chair too.  Wow.  Something to file away for another day…

"small" blacker serving table

“small” blacker serving table

The larger version clocks in at 59 9/16″ wide by 51 5/8″ deep by 30 3/8″ tall, with a base that is 23 1/2″ square.  You can see that the style is identical, although the larger version appears to have supports under the table top.

Larger Blacker table

Larger Blacker table

So here is my updated CAD model.  I am not trying to get it to be a complete clone of the original, but I want it to be visually very close.  I spent time making the legs thicker up to 2 3/16″ to try to match the original, then backed them down to 1 7/8″ with the thought that I could make them out of the 8/4 stock I already have.  I think they look large enough visually at this dimension.  I spent a lot of time playing with the details on the bottom of the leg, eventually adding some subtle shaping to taper the leg in the last inch and a half, and then adding the “Blacker leg indent” on the two outer faces.  The indent is not on the original version of this table, but it was on a number of furniture legs in the Blacker house.

Close up of leg ends

Close up of leg ends – the wood texture is getting in my way here…

I changed the height of the skirts and stretchers, making both slightly smaller, and reduced the round over on the edge of these parts too.  I moved the stretcher a little closer to the skirt.  I played with different widths for the start and end of the cloud lift design — this is the most obvious different between mine and the original.  The “lift” on the original is more abrupt, the transition from one horizontal surface to the other is vertical, where on mine it’s angled.  I may change mine to match the original in this aspect.  The hight of the lift on mine is taller than the original too, I’m on the fence about whether to change that.

I added the ebony pegs on the legs, although as I look at them I may want to increase the sizes one step.  I have 1/4″, 5/16″ and 3/8″ — I will probably increase them all a step.

I removed the inlay on the legs, only because it was just a quick mockup and was getting in the way of the other changes I was making to the leg shapes.

Version 2 of my Blacker table design

Version 2 of my Blacker table design

So, I want to experiment a bit more with the skirt and stretcher profiles, and work out the joinery for those parts (I just have a single wide stub tenon right now).  Then model the actual inlay that will be on the legs.  The top needs some attention too — joinery details, ebony plugs and ebony spline and changes to the inlay layout.  Another couple of hours and I’ll have a workable CAD model that I could build.

I measured a space where I think this could go in the house — right under where I want to put the Thorsen cabinet.  It’s narrower but deeper than the sofa table that is there now, which might leave enough room for a pair of chairs to flank it…

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Cadfael: Blacker Tables

(With apologies to Derek Jacobi and his TV series about a Crusader-turned-monk that investigates murders)

I’m ready to start on the Arts & Crafts bookcase, although I’m not ready to buy the expensive, wide quartered white oak sight unseen and have it shipped here.  So I’m still noodling on how to get the materials I need for that.

While I’m doing that, I had a couple of ideas I wanted to play with.  One is this side table from the Blacker house.  I believe there are two different versions of this table, in different sizes, made for the blacker house, one that is scaled to be roughly the size of a side table, and another that was a serving table in the dining room.  I need to read through my books to get a petter handle on this.  Here is the side table version from the Ari Institute of Chicago.  They list the dimensions as 29 7/8 x 36 x 22 1/8 in.

Original Blacker table at the Art Institute of Chicago

Original Blacker table at the Art Institute of Chicago

Working form this photograph and dimensions I started building parts in CAD.  I’ve been through a couple of revisions, tweaking things to get the scale right.  I still don’t have the scale quite right, although I’m getting close.

First draft of the design for the Blacker table

First draft of the design for the Blacker table

I think the skirts are too tall still.  The legs, currently at 1 5/8″, seemed too big compared to the Thorsen table I recently made.  I think they are actually too small in reality.  I found a furniture maker in Texas who made a version of this table, and emailed him to get his take on the dimensions.  In his version the legs are actually 55mm or 2.165″.  The top on his looks out of scale, but the proportions on the base look pretty good to me.  His version uses the blacker leg indent detail, I don’t believe the originals had that, but I’m not positive.

Blacker table by Leon Nolte

Blacker table by Leon Nolte

I just doodled in some inlay to get a sense of how this might look as a finished piece, the inlay design is still somewhat crude.  I’m going to play with this design a little more — I have enough Sapele left for the legs I think…

Another view of the table mock up

Another view of the table mock up

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Inlay, Again

So I decided to try doing some simple inlay, I ordered the micro router base for the Foredom tool from William Ng today, and a couple of micro router bits.  Now I’ve done it.  I’ll probably start with some flush inlay first for practice before attempting to do the bolection style.  I wish there was a course where someone would walk me through the process to get me jump started, I’m finding it a little intimidating frankly.

I did find a set of DVDs on inlay by Larry Robinson, who does some amazing work, primarily on guitars, in shell and metal.  I don’t care for his “meet the beetles” guitar in this video, but the other work is pretty stunning.  The DVDs are available from Stewart MacDonald, they are a little spendy so I just got the first one to check it out for now.  I’ll post a review after I watch it.

 

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Inlay

I’ve been really fascinated on inlay lately.  Well, more correctly, I’ve been obsessing over inlay.  I’ve wanted to try doing “Bolection Inlay” as seen on a number of Greene & Greene pieces for a while.  I almost went to the G&G inlay class at the William Ng school this past year, but it just wasn’t in the budget at the time.  Now it looks like he’s not offering it again this year, instead he has a regular inlay class planned. R A T S,

The Greene & Greene I’ve seen is mostly (all?) raised above the surface, and subtly carved / shaped.  I’ve never done anything like this, but mu understanding of the process is that the individual pieces of inlay are sawn out and fit together on top of the paper pattern, then super glued together into one unit.  The outline is then scribed onto the surface of the wood and a cavity is excavated using a tiny router bit.  The neatest setup I’ve seen is this router base from William Ng that uses a Foredom flex shaft tool for power.

William Ng micro router base with Foredom hand piece

William Ng micro router base with Foredom hand piece

It’s not clear to me if the individual pieces are “carved” or shaped first — since they are being drizzled with super glue I can see some problem here.  With metal and shell inlay pieces they are nonporous and the glue won’t affect things.  In fact, with any inlay that will be flushed up after inletting it’s probably not a concern as the first step after gluing it in is to flatten it with coarse sandpaper.  But with inlay that is carved first ant then wet with superglue it seems like it could interfere with the finishing.  I can see two options (I’m just thinking out loud, I have yet to try this myself):  Either glue in the uncarved inlay pieces, and shape them after gluing into the substrate, of apply an even coat of super glue so that becomes the base for the final finish.

I’m on the cusp of convincing myself to buy a few inlay tools (not much is required, mostly the base above) and giving this a try.

I’ve collected bunches of pictures from the internet to augment what I have in my books.  Just recently I came across Jonathan W. McLean’s website, which shows some outstanding G&G inlay work.  Well, all of the work looks spectacular, but the G&G inlay is what caught my eye.  I’m only going to post pictures on one example, you should check out his site for more.

Reproduction of a table from the Thorsen house by Jonathan McLean

Reproduction of a table from the Thorsen house by Jonathan McLean

Detail of inlay work by Jonathan McLean.  Koa stems, Vermillion flowers and thorns, leaves inlayed with ebony veins, and semi precious stone accents.

Detail of inlay work by Jonathan McLean. Koa stems, Vermillion flowers and thorns, leaves inlayed with ebony veins, and semi precious stone accents.

Top view

Top view

 

 

 

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Thorsen Cabinet Details

I spent today futzing with the last details on the cabinet before starting to apply finish — which I’m going to wait to start until I’m fresh and go over the cabinet one more time with clearer eyes.  But, I think it’s ready for finish.  All the hardware has been mounted, the parts fit and sanded to 320, and today I sorted out the last little bits.

First, as Ralph pointed out, I needed to make the retaining strips to hold the stained glass panel in place.  I probably would have remembered that, although whether I’d have remembered it before starting to install the glass is a coin toss.

Back of the door with the copper framework for the stained glass in place

Back of the door with the copper framework for the stained glass in place

Back of the door showing the wood strips to hold the glass in, cut to length, shaped and sanded.

Back of the door showing the wood strips to hold the glass in, cut to length, shaped and sanded.  I’m going to leave the top copper cross-bar exposed on the inside, it will be black from the patina, so I think it will look fine.

With that chore out of the way I mounted the door pull and chopped all of the square holes for the ebony plugs.  This was ease compared to the recent Thorsen table which had 40 plugs, there are only 12 in the door and another 6 in the case.

Handle test installed, square holes made for the ebony plugs

Handle test installed, square holes made for the ebony plugs

About the door pull – I thought seriously about putting a mortised lockset into the cabinet, but eventually realized that the backspacing for the key didn’t look right.  To have that look right I need narrower stiles.

Then is was just a matter of making the ebony pegs, I used the little sanding board I made for the last time I did this, and it didn’t take much time at all to knock these. out.  Maybe five or ten minutes.  Less than two Lighting Hopkins songs.

Setup for making the Ebony plugs

Setup for making the Ebony plugs

Plugs done, 3/8" and 1/4" square (about .010" oversized)

Plugs done, 3/8″ and 1/4″ square (about .010″ oversized)

To glue the pegs in, I first bevel the sides slightly so I can get them started.  Then I apply glue into the hole using a little wood coffee stir stick cut square on the end.  Then I set the peg in the hole and tap it down with a plastic mallet.  I try to stop just before the rounded-over edge gets to the surface of the door.

Put glue in the holes -- keep it off the face Joe!

Put glue in the holes — keep it off the face Joe!

Set a peg in the hole

Set a peg in the hole

Tap the pegs down until they are just proud of the surface

Tap the pegs down until they are just proud of the surface

And that’s it.  The finishing should be pretty straightforward, and the glass isn’t too complex (although I still have to do the layout for that).  The end is in sight, I need be starting another project soon.  Speaking of which, I priced out the wide, thick quarter sawn white oak I need for the bookcase project — it’s probably $1,000.  Gulp.  That might not be the next project after all!

Door ready for finish

Door ready for finish

 

 

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Arts & Crafts Bookcase – Another Option

I’m playing with some different ideas for the final details on the Mission-ish bookcase.  I think the basic bookcase with the Greene & Greene stained glass panels I posted earlier has a lot of merit.  Even without any inlay the glass will add a lot of “zing”.

I wanted to try something more traditionally “mission”.  This version has basic leaded divided panels in the doors, and a original Ellis inlay design.  It would be more subtle.

Bookcase with "Mission" glass and inlay

Bookcase with “Mission” glass and inlay

The inlay design I’m using is out of Bob Lang’s “Craftsman Inlay Designs” book — which is out of print, but all the same designs are in his “Great Book of Shop Drawings for Craftsman Furniture“.  This design is intended for a table leg, so I cut off the bottom extension to make it fit in the smaller horizontal space.  I could add some more elements to better fill the horizontal space, I might also play with different designs.  My cad software isn’t doing a good job rendering this design, there are some visual glitches, it’s supposed to be pewter and copper

Closeup of the inlay design

Closeup of the inlay design

I’m going to keep playing with different design ideas, but I’m holding off on doing a full layout of most of these in CAD for now as that will be a giant time sink.  If I decide to go with the design from the Earl C. Anthony house for the glass it will be faster to print out the original photos to scale and use that as a guide to draw out the pattern for the glass.

 

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Greene & Greene Cabinet

Months ago (!) I started making this Greene & Greene style cabinet, inspired by a cabinet in the Thorsen house.  I got sidetracked on a number of other projects including making a side table to match it.  I’m back on this project and hope to get it wrapped up, uhhhmmm, soon.

"Thorsen House Cabinet"

“Thorsen House Cabinet”

This project is mostly done from a woodworking perspective.  All of the parts are made, fit and nearly final prep’d for finish.

I have to make the stained glass panels for the door, and do a couple of final operations on the door itself.  First, I need to add the dozen or so ebony pegs required to finish it, and do some final sanding.  There is the handle to be mounted too.  The the whole cabinet gets a once over to chaco for shop dings and some touch up sanding.

For the stained glass I wanted to make a framework to solder the glass panels into.  The first furniture projects with stained glass that I did I installed the glass just like you would in a window – the raw edge of the glass against the rebate.  Then I realized that most stained glass windows show a soldered edge (or metal) around the perimeter.  I’ve seen several different ways to do this, and I wanted to try an idea I had.

My thought was to build a metal frame that was maybe 1/16″ to 3/32″ smaller on the opening than the opening in the door itself – so the just a little of the metal showed.  If the frame fit the door then it’s easier to make the glass fit the frame than making the glass and having to calculate the dimensions for the frame that would be added around the periphery.  I hope that makes sense.

I decided to make the frame out of copper because I could TIG weld it.  It would have been slightly easier to do it in brass (which isn’t weldable) as it comes in more widths and I wouldn’t have had to rip narrow strips of 1/8″ thick copper on the bandsaw.  As it turned out, when I went to weld it I discovered a leak in the water cooler for the torch, so I ended up soldering it anyway.  A new return hose for the welder is on order and I should have my TIG welder back up soon.

The approach was to fit slightly wider strips into the rebate, tape them in place, then scribe the shape of the door opening.  Then I cut the copper strips to shape, sanded the cuts smooth, and soldered them together.  Fairly simple.

Copper bars are fit into the glass rebate on the back of the door.  The opposite side has been painted with blue "Dykem" layout fluid.

Copper bars are fit into the glass rebate on the back of the door. The opposite side has been painted with blue “Dykem” layout fluid.  The long thin strips have already been “ripped” to width before fitting the horizontal bars.

The copper strips are taped in place, then shims added to support the copper when the door is flipped over.

The copper strips are taped in place, then shims added to support the copper when the door is flipped over.

The opening is scribed onto  the copper using a transfer punch (to get a 3/32" offset from the edge of the wood).  Then the whole assembly is taken apart, the copper sawn to the layout line and sanded smooth.

The opening is scribed onto the copper using a transfer punch (to get a 3/32″ offset from the edge of the wood). Then the whole assembly is taken apart, the copper sawn to the layout line and sanded smooth.

After sawing the pieces to the shape of the inside opening I reassembled them into the glass rebate.  The fit of the copper into the rebate is tight, I actually spring the copper crossbars into place so they stay put while I’m soldering.  I lightly grind the outside after soldering so there is a tiny gap between the outside of the copper frame and the glass rebate after I solder then together.

Add a small bit of flux (the spots on the wood are hide glue I haven't cleaned up yet, not flux!)

Add a small bit of flux (the spots on the wood are hide glue I haven’t cleaned up yet, not flux!)

...and solder the joints.

…and solder the joints.

I only solder the joints on one side for now, if I try to solder the other side they will most likely come apart!  Once I have the glass in and tack solder the glass to the surround everything will stay together nicely.

Side frame soldered

Side frame soldered

Main frame soldered

Main frame soldered

Both frames soldered -- face side up, in the orientation as seen from the front of the door

Both frames soldered — face side up, in the orientation as seen from the front of the door.  The solder on this side “bled through” from soldering the back side.

With the door

With the door

The glass should be delivered today, so I should get the door prep’d, install the ebony pegs and start thinking about finishing the wood.

 

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