Thorsen Cabinet Details

I spent today futzing with the last details on the cabinet before starting to apply finish — which I’m going to wait to start until I’m fresh and go over the cabinet one more time with clearer eyes.  But, I think it’s ready for finish.  All the hardware has been mounted, the parts fit and sanded to 320, and today I sorted out the last little bits.

First, as Ralph pointed out, I needed to make the retaining strips to hold the stained glass panel in place.  I probably would have remembered that, although whether I’d have remembered it before starting to install the glass is a coin toss.

Back of the door with the copper framework for the stained glass in place

Back of the door with the copper framework for the stained glass in place

Back of the door showing the wood strips to hold the glass in, cut to length, shaped and sanded.

Back of the door showing the wood strips to hold the glass in, cut to length, shaped and sanded.  I’m going to leave the top copper cross-bar exposed on the inside, it will be black from the patina, so I think it will look fine.

With that chore out of the way I mounted the door pull and chopped all of the square holes for the ebony plugs.  This was ease compared to the recent Thorsen table which had 40 plugs, there are only 12 in the door and another 6 in the case.

Handle test installed, square holes made for the ebony plugs

Handle test installed, square holes made for the ebony plugs

About the door pull – I thought seriously about putting a mortised lockset into the cabinet, but eventually realized that the backspacing for the key didn’t look right.  To have that look right I need narrower stiles.

Then is was just a matter of making the ebony pegs, I used the little sanding board I made for the last time I did this, and it didn’t take much time at all to knock these. out.  Maybe five or ten minutes.  Less than two Lighting Hopkins songs.

Setup for making the Ebony plugs

Setup for making the Ebony plugs

Plugs done, 3/8" and 1/4" square (about .010" oversized)

Plugs done, 3/8″ and 1/4″ square (about .010″ oversized)

To glue the pegs in, I first bevel the sides slightly so I can get them started.  Then I apply glue into the hole using a little wood coffee stir stick cut square on the end.  Then I set the peg in the hole and tap it down with a plastic mallet.  I try to stop just before the rounded-over edge gets to the surface of the door.

Put glue in the holes -- keep it off the face Joe!

Put glue in the holes — keep it off the face Joe!

Set a peg in the hole

Set a peg in the hole

Tap the pegs down until they are just proud of the surface

Tap the pegs down until they are just proud of the surface

And that’s it.  The finishing should be pretty straightforward, and the glass isn’t too complex (although I still have to do the layout for that).  The end is in sight, I need be starting another project soon.  Speaking of which, I priced out the wide, thick quarter sawn white oak I need for the bookcase project — it’s probably $1,000.  Gulp.  That might not be the next project after all!

Door ready for finish

Door ready for finish

 

 

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7 thoughts on “Thorsen Cabinet Details

  1. Superb work as per your usual. Pretty soon you’ll be making ebony plugs in your sleep. I’m really interested in seeing the stained glass come together on this. I know nothing about that process.

    Greg

  2. prostheta

    Delightful as always! Pop a piece of masking tape over your plug holes before punching them in. They really make it easy not to mark up the face when tapping plugs and prevent glue contamination.

    White Oak is a real premium material! Wow. Big money for that job….

    • Thanks, that’s a good idea about the tape.

      The last time I bought white oak (locally) I was able to find some nice 10″+ wide boards and it was about half the bf cost. Needless to say, I’ll be shopping around for this material! Now I’m not sure what to build next though.

      • I have a lot of projects which I intend to realise when we purchase our new house. Most of them are about unifying the look of the house rather than just popping one or two G&G/shaker/craftsman pieces around. Things like doors, dados, shelves, curtain surrounds, mirrors, picture frames, light switches, etc. I seriously doubt that you will have difficulty finding a new project! Maybe it’ll sit on the back burner until some good deal comes up on Oak.

        I’ve started using wide strips of tape a lot recently. I started because I was finding pencil lines re-appearing in lighter woods (Maple, Birch) when I thought I’d sanded them out. They also come in handy left in place to mask wood off when I oil/wax it before assembly to prevent the finish stopping glue ingress. I just trace around the “pad” a few mm in with a blade and peel the rest off. No more squeezeout stopping dye/stain uptake!

  3. The wooden keepers for the stained glass are nice. Much better looking then glaziers points or nails, even if they won’t be seen.

  4. Adam

    Have you tried these guys as a lumber source?

    http://www.dunham-hardwoods.com

    This blogger has been thoroughly satisfied with their quality and price.

    http://honeydowoodworking.blogspot.com/?m=1

    He has a couple if reviews.

    • I can get the species I need (quarter sawn white oak) locally, and at a reasonable price. But I want wide (10″ to 12″) boards that will finish out at a full 1″ or 1.125″ depending on where they go in the finished cabinet. 5/4 or 6/4 x 12″ wide Quartersawn White Oak is pretty uncommon. Most times it’s 4/4 or maybe 8/4 and only 6″ wide.

      Plan B, if I can’t get the lumber I need, is to get 8/4″, re-saw it to 6/4 and glue up wider boards…assuming the 8/4 is at least 6″ wide and has nice figure. The off-cuts from re-sawing should be thick enough to use for the shiplapped back.

      There is a place that claims to have the wide boards I need, but the price is about twice what I’d pay for narrower boards locally.

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