Posts Tagged With: Thorsen Table

Thorsen House Table Plans

I made the last few updates to my plans for the Thorsen House Table yesterday, so I wanted to post them before I forgot.  This version has the final templates for the skirt piercings with centerlines to make is simple to get them aligned on your parts.  There were a few missing dimensions in the earlier revision too.

As always, you’re free to make this for yourself, and share the plans with friends, but please don’t try to sell the plans on ebay or anything.

Print these plans on 8.5″ x 11″ paper, and to make turn off “shrink to fit” or “fit to page” in the printer options on your computer.  Most computers will end up shrinking these 10% or more by default.

Final Thorsen Plans

Final Thorsen Table Plans

Final Thorsen Table Plans

 

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Finished. Fin.

OK, the table is done.

There were a couple of “dry spray” spots on the base the I hit with 600, then I rubbed it out with 0000 steel wool and “Antique Mahogany” Briwax.  I wiped it down, let the wax flash off and buffed it with a soft cloth.  I gave the whole thing a second coat of the same wax, then installed the top.

Installing the top using the shop-made buttons.  You know I was being careful not to drill through the top or snap off a screw...

Installing the top using the shop-made buttons. You know I was being careful not to drill through the top or snap off a screw…

Then I brought the table inside and displaced the table I made for the same spot 15+ years ago when I was previously on a “woodworking kick”.  I like it, I’m eager to get the cabinet finished next…and to start some new projects.  I have an idea for an arts & crafts-ish bookcase for the guest room that might be fun.

Anyway, here are the finished pictures.  I need a better setup to take pictures of completed projects…

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Drat, there is a piece of lint on the top. This shows off the color pretty nicely.

More views

More views

Another view, sans lint

Another view, sans lint

And what of the table that used to be in this spot?  I took it out to the shop to refinish.  The top is loose (the metal z-clips worked out of the slots) and the finish is worn off the top.  I’ll sand the top smooth and probably go over the whole things with Linseed Oil and Blond Shellac.  It’s made out of tiger maple, birdsseye maple and western quilted maple on the top – and bloodwood for the stringing if I recall correctly.  The original finish was plain Danish Oil.

The once-fabulous "spider table"

The once-fabulous “spider table”

 

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Spray Day

OK.  I think I nearly done with the finishing on the Thorsen table.

I dug out my old Binks HVLP gun, diluted the same Garnet Shellac I’ve been using , loaded the gun and crossed my fingers.

Spray gun loaded with Garnet Shellac

Spray gun loaded with Garnet Shellac

Turns out, compared to spraying high tech catalyzed auto paints, spraying Shellac is pretty simple.  I’m guessing I was spraying a mix that was a 1 pound cut or less, I definitely wanted the mix diluted enough that I could spray it without worrying about dark spots if I hit one area with an extra coat.  Kind of like spraying candy apple car paint.

Before spraying I rubbed the dyed and oiled (and cured) top with a white scotchbrite pad to remove any nibs or oil spots.  Gently — after rubbing through the finish on the top once I’m not eager to re-do it again.

Sapele top has been dyed with Trans-Tint Red-Brown water dye, liberally soaked with Boiled Linseed Oil, wiped dry and allowed to dry for 4 days.

Sapele top has been dyed with Trans-Tint Red-Brown water dye, liberally soaked with Boiled Linseed Oil, wiped dry and allowed to dry for 4 days.

I sprayed the edges first, then did one pass parallel to the breadboard ends, and a second pass with the grain.  Then I left it to dry for about 15 minutes.

First double coat applied

First double coat applied — when it drys it looked much less shiny

While the top was drying I started sanding out the base with 600 grit, and decided that it could be improved.  So after going over the bottom with 600 I shot it with a couple of thin coats too.

Re-coating the base

Re-coating the base

In the end I sprayed probably 6 thin coats on the top, both sides.  I sprayed a double coat, let it dry, and scuff sanded it to remove any roughness.  After the first double coat I used 320 grit, after that I just rubbed it with a white Scotchbrite pad.

My job right now — and this is probably the hardest part for me — is to leave it alone so it can throughly dry.  After that I’ll rub it with 0000 steel wool (carefully) and wax.  This will level the finish and add a little more color.  In the outside sun the table has a nice red cast.  Under the greenish florescent shop lights it looks brown.  It will probably be somewhere in between in the house.

Sprayed, but not rubbed out or waxed

Sprayed, but not rubbed out or waxed

Is it dry enough to rub out yet?  Nope.

Is it dry enough to rub out yet? Nope.

 

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Two steps forward, two steps back

I mentioned in my previous post that I’d screwed up the finish on the top for the Thorsen Table.

Getting the finish on evenly, without dark puddles there the breadboard ends met the top and without streaks was a challenge.  I probably should have diluted the Shellac a bit more.  But in the end, I got a decent buildup without any real issues.

The problem was when I started rubbing it with steel wool I went through the shellac in a couple of places, and the color difference was very obvious.  I tried toughing it up and things went downhill from there.

In the end I poured alcohol over the whole thing and scrubbed it with steel wool and dried it with rags.  I repeated this until I was sure I’d gotten all of the shellac off, and pulled enough of the Linseed Oil base coat off that I could re-dye it.

The stripping process lightened the dye job, which was also too light to begin with.  The table base was a bit darker, so I re-applied the dye and let it site a good 5 minutes to make sure I got good penetration.  I scrubbed it with 0000 steel wool while the dye was soaking in to help things along.

Then I let it dry overnight, and applied a fresh coat of Linseed Oil.  I let the piece soak up oil for an hour before wiping it off and taking this picture.

photo

Top, after stripping, re-dying and applying oil

The top has been drying for several days now, and I’ll apply shellac again tomorrow.  I know I said I didn’t want to introduce another variable, but after mulling it over I’ve decided that I’ll try spraying the shellac this time.  I’ll to a sample piece first to make sure I have a workable dilution to get coverage and flow out.  I’ve painted cars, so I’m not overly concerned with this step (famous last words there!).  I might scuff sand the base and shelf and shoot them with a very thin final coat too.

For comparison, this is the top (with ~3 coats of Garnet Shellac) before I ruined it with steel wool.  It’s not a bad color, but it needed to be a little darker I think.

Top with 2-3 coats of shellac -- I accidentally rubbed through the shellac and stripped it after this was taken.

Top with 2-3 coats of shellac — I accidentally rubbed through the shellac and stripped it after this was taken.

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Starting Finishing

When I get the this point in a project I really can’t help myself, I’m so eager to start applying finish and see how the project is going to look.  With this table, I’ve been digging the ribbon stripe figure in the wood, but the color wasn’t right for the genre of the piece.  I wanted more of a deep red-brown color, and my typical finishing schedule involves a dye base coat followed by linseed oil and shellac with a colored wax topcoat.

All of the parts were sprayed with water and allowed to dry, then scuff sanded during construction to pre-raise the grain.  When I was at the store yesterday I picked up a couple of household squirt bottles.  I only needed one, but for some reason I got two.  Good thing I did, the first one came apart in my hands halfway through getting a coat of dye on the base.  THAT was relaxing, let me tell you.

I’m using Trans-Tint Red-Brown dye, one bottle dissolved into a half gallon of water.  This picture doesn’t really show the effects very well, although you can probably see how the figure is becoming more dramatic.

Just beginning to spray on the water-based dye - the right side has dye and the left doesn't

Just beginning to spray on the water-based dye – the right side has dye and the left doesn’t

I wet out the table base, which took a little while because the sprayer didn’t really work all that well.  I turned the table over to make sure I got dye everywhere, then I grabbed a rag and started drying it off.  I used an air nozzle to blow out the joints to make sure I got all the dye off.  I followed the same procedure on the top and shelf, shooting for about five minutes of “soak” time.  The color is pretty dramatic at this point, especially in the sun.

Dyed pieces drying in the sun

Dyed pieces drying in the sun

I knew from my previous experiments not to panic as the color will change more with the additional topcoats, but this was redder than I expected.  I’m glad I didn’t use the “Red Mahogany” dye, I think that would have been too much.

Once the parts were completely dry I burnished them with a white scotchbrite pad to remove any fuzzies and took them back into the shop for a coat of plain linseed oil.  I slathered in on nice and thick and let it sit for 10 minutes or so.  The color looks a lot more brown at this point, but part of that is the difference in lighting in the shop compared to the sunlight.

Linseed oil soaking in

Linseed oil soaking in

After the oil had a little time to soak in, I hoped the parts off and took them back outside for a comparison shot in the sun.  The color is not as red and the picture shows, it has more brown in it.  The sun really brings out the red for some reason.

Dye and Linseed Oil base coats applied

Dye and Linseed Oil base coats applied

Dye and Linseed Oil base coats applied

Dye and Linseed Oil base coats applied

I left the parts at this stage to dry overnight so the oil could soak into the wood and flash off a bit.  I plan to add a couple of coats of Garnet Shellac this morning, then rub it out with 0000 steel wool and apply a coat of black wax.  The color should get slightly darker and browner and have a nice even sheen.  Fingers crossed

 

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Adding the ebony pegs

Drum roll…the Ebony pegs are made and glued into the Thorsen table.  It feels like I haven’t worked on this project i ages, but it was only last weekend that I finished assembling the breadboard top for the table.

Since I had quite a few pegs to make I set up a board with all of my sandpaper grits so I could work my way down the line.  This was a lot petter than just having a pile of sandpaper on the bench that I have to shuffle through over and over.  Each grit is layer over a scotchbrite pad for cushioning, to help form the pillowed shape on the end of the Ebony bar.

Ebony Peg Workstation.  Just out of view to the right is a bench hook with a stop for cutting the pegs off the end of the bar.

Ebony Peg Workstation. Just out of view to the right is a bench hook with a stop for cutting the pegs off the end of the bar.

I’m still on the fence about the “best” way to make the pegs.  It seems like it would be faster to spin them against the sandpaper with a drill, although I’m not sure that is the case.  I discovered that if I don’t hand sand the end using 150 grit against a flat surface there will still be marks left in the finished end from the saw I use to cut the peg off.  Then spinning the Ebony bar with a drill works fine, but it leaves a finish with concentric marks, so I have to do a little hand work on the last two grits anyway.  Also, the shape from spinning with the drill isn’t exactly right.  I used the drill for about half of the pegs and the the rest buy hand.  I think it was about the same amount of time either way.

In total, I needed 40 pegs — 24 at 3/8″ square, 8 at 5/16″ square, and 8 at 1/4″ square.  You know I was glad to have these behind me.  After this picture was taken I used a 1/2″ chisel to bevel the bottom edges of the sides to make it easier to start the peg in it’s hole.  I made all of the pens .010″ to .015″ oversized so they are a fairly snug fit in the mortises.

40 Ebony Pegs in 3/8" square, 1/4" square and 5/16" square

40 Ebony Pegs in 3/8″ square, 1/4″ square and 5/16″ square

Finally I glued them into the mortises.  I use a coffee stir stick as a spatula to apply yellow glue in each hole, doing my best to keep it off the surface of the wood so it doesn’t screw up the finish.  There isn’t anything particularly trick about installing the pegs — although I measures the mortises and made sure my pegs were shorter than the shallowest mortise.  Set the peg in the hole and tap it in place with a plastic mallet.  Just don’t drive it too far, or put a ding in the surface of the wood.

Installing the first of the Ebony pegs

Installing the first of the Ebony pegs

So that’s a wrap for the fabrication on the table.  I’m going to finish it without first installing the top or lower shelf.  Speaking of which, the garage floor trick work just great to straighten out the cupped lower shelf.  After the glue dries for an hour or so I’ll probably apply the dye stain.  The pegs are so tight that the glue isn’t even necessary,  so I don’t think the moisture from the dye will cause any problems.

Table with Ebony pegs installed

Table with Ebony pegs installed

 

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A top for the table

My goal for today was to get the Thorsen side table more or less constructed today, leaving the finishing to do at the same time as the “Thorsen Cabinet” I’m making.  I think I’m at that point, although I may need to re-make the lower shelf.  More about that in a bit.

Yesterday I got the joinery finished on the breadboard ends for the top.  Picking up from there, the next job was to make all of the “mortises” for the ebony pegs.  I picked up a set of the square punches the Lee Valley sells.  Well, it was a father’s day gift from my wife.  OK, actually my wife forgot to get me anything, so I got them for myself.  So she wouldn’t feel bad.  Right?

Anyway, these are very handy.  They made short work of the Sapele.  When I used them the first time on White Oak they didn’t bite as week as I thought they should, but on Sapele they did the trick without any hesitation.  Not that they didn’t work well on the Oak, it just took a few more hits with the hammer than I expected.  I’m using a pretty light hammer though.

I laid out all of the locations using a story stick to get the spacing even.  I used a marking gauge to find the center of the edges (the breadboard ends are about 1/8″ thicker than the top), and then marked the location with an awl.

I made a story stick to lay out the mortise locations the same on all four sides.

I made a story stick to lay out the mortise locations the same on all four sides.

Then I drilled each pilot hole.  Each punch uses a drill bit that is 3.32″ smaller than the punch size.  With a brad point bit it was simple to drop it in the awl mark and drill about 3/8″ to 1/2″ deep.

Drilling the hole to remove the bulk of the waste

Drilling the hole to remove the bulk of the waste

Then I used the drill to locate the square chisel over the hole.  I used a small square to get the chisel straight, then removed the drill bit and hammered the chisel in.

Align the square punch with the drill bit in the hole and a square on the side

Align the square punch with the drill bit in the hole and a square on the side.  (and yes, I’ll clean up the shoulder by the tenon with a chisel before assembly)

After pulling the square punch out of the hole I use a smaller chisel to break up the waste and clean the bottom of the hole.  It only takes a minute to do one hole – it took longer to write this than to do the holes I think.

Square mortises for the ebony plugs done

Square mortises for the ebony plugs done

The other thing I had to do — which took way longer than the horses — was to shape the ends of the breadboard caps and sand everything smooth.  I started with a 1/8″ round over bit, then 150 grit shop roll and a single cut file.  Then lots of hand sanding to try to get organic-looking contours and make everything feel nice to the touch.  Finally I wet the parts to raise the grain.

Parts drying after being wet down to raise the grain in preparation for dying

Parts drying after being wet down to raise the grain in preparation for dying

I used a little glue in the middle, and screwed through the breadboard end (in the square holes) to hold these together.  I made the screw holes slightly oversized, hopefully enough to allow the wood to move.

Top assembled with screws, glue drying

Top assembled with screws, glue drying

I also notched the corners for the lower shelf and cut a rabbet on the back.  Unfortunately, the lower shelf cupped pretty badly since I made it last weekend.  With the middle sitting flat the ends are at least 3/16″ up off the bench.  I’m hoping it will straighten itself out by laying it on the garage floor overnight.  If not, I’ll have to make another part.

I like how the table looks at this stage, once I get the ebony plugs in and build up some color it should be a nice piece.

Nearly completed table

Nearly completed table

Another view

Another view

I have a boatload of ebony pegs to make, maybe one night this week I can get out in the shop can do that.  Then the stained glass for the Thorsen cabinet, and finish.

 

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The Big Ooze

It’s supposed to be blistering here today, close to 90.  Regular readers will know that means it will be 100+ in the shop even with the doors and windows open and the fan running, for some reason the garage I use for my wood shop seems to suck up the heat.  To beat the heat I got an early start, I was sanding parts at 6:30 am.  It took almost three more hours of hand sanding to get everything in good shape for finishing.  I had to scrape a few areas where there was some tear out from the plane, and then lots of hand work to blend the contours.  I think this approach makes Greene & Greene objects look more authentic, but after hours of sanding I’m thinking of working on developing a taste for flat, square furniture that I can power sand into submission.

The “waterfall” detail on the bottoms of the legs, including the domed end that is on the bottom received a lot of attention, getting the inside radius smooth was all hand work.  Once the table is done they will end up being a subtle detail as they are on the bottom of the legs, on the inside faces.

The waterfall leg detail, detail sanded

The waterfall leg detail, detail sanded

After all the parts were sanded to 320 grit I flew the dust out of the pores and wet them down to raise the grain.  Then I lightly sanded them again with worn 320 grit paper.

Parts sanded and ready for the "grain raising" step

Parts sanded and ready for the “grain raising” step

I did a final check of everything, double checked my assembly numbers to make sure they were legible (nothing like trying to cram the wrong tenon into a mortise while glue is running up your arm).  Finally I took a deep breath and decided to glue up the base.  I laid out all the parts so they were positioned for the glue up.  I set up my clamps, heated up a glass of water to warm the hide glue and said a prayer to the patron saints of sawdust.

Parts laid out for gluing - and double checked for fit and orientation

Parts laid out for gluing – and double checked for fit and orientation

I don’t know why glue ups cause me so much stress, but I do know I’m not alone.  I read somewhere that even James Krenov stressed over glue ups.  Since I’d test fit everything I was pretty sure I’d be ok.  I thought about doing the table base glue up in two stages — do two sides, let them cure, then assemble the two sides together.  I’m not that patient though, I want to get further along  before the weekend is gone.

So, somewhere in this picture, hiding under the clamps is a Greene & Greene table.  It looks like I got all of the stretchers in the right orientation this time.

Can you find the table in this picture?

Can you find the table in this picture?

I also got the top for the table roughed out.  Last weekend I glued up a panel for the top and cut it to size.  I got the joinery for the breadboard ends done this morning too.  Before I can assemble this part I need to make an of the mortises for the eight (!) ebony pegs the go around the perimeter of the top.  I also need to sand and shape the parts.  Hopefully I can get the done today too, and get it assembled.  If so, then tomorrow is ebony peg time — and I’ll switch back to the Greene & Greene cabinet.

Joinery for the breadboard top

Joinery for the breadboard top

Top dry fit, a few minor adjustments, a bunch of ebony pegs and some detailing and this will be done too

Top dry fit, a few minor adjustments, a bunch of ebony pegs and some detailing and this will be done too

On the cabinet I need to make the copper frame to hold the stained glass, and take care of a few final details on the door.  I doubt I’ll get both projects to the “finishing” stage this weekend, but it should be close.  I also have to run a couple of errands, including picking up the screws I need to assemble the top and some stained glass supplies.

Back to it…

 

 

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Button, button…

When I was writing my blog post yesterday morning I realized I’d forgotten to make a provision for attaching the top to the table base.  I kew I needed to do it, but in the excitement of getting close to glue-up I lost sight of it.

So first thing, I drew up some quick dimensions for a batch of buttons to attach the table top, and headed out to the shop in search of a suitable off cut to use in making them.  I found a piece and went to town.  The article I linked from yesterday’s post shows Christian Becksvoort making them but cutting a rabbet across a scrap and then cross-cutting.  My scrap had the grain running in the wrong direction to do that, so I set up a dado blade to cut a rabbet in the end, then cross cut it with a hand saw to length, then repeated until all my stock was gone.  Add counter-sunk holes for a #10 screw and some chamfers and they were done.  I tossed them in a bag of linseed oil for the rest of the day after I took this picture.

Table top attachment buttons

Table top attachment buttons

Then I cut some slots in the back of the skirts to receive the buttons.  I set up stop blocks on the router table and cut these to depth in two passes.  I set the distance from the edge of the skirt to the slot about 1/16″ larger than the step in the attachment button so when they are installed they will draw the table down snugly.  The slots are long enough to allow the buttons to slide about 1/8″ in either direction when the wood moves.

Test fitting the attachment buttons to the skirts

Test fitting the attachment buttons to the skirts

How would I do this without a router table?  You could certainly chop shallow mortises in the back like this, that would be simple enough.  You could also saw or plow a thin groove and use these Z-clips from Lee Valley instead of making wood blocks.  I used them on a little side table I made once and they worked out OK…  They loosened up about a year ago, but the table is about 15 years old at this point and needs some re-jabbing anyway.  I’m replacing it with the Thorsen table, and I’ll clean it up and refinish it then.

Alternate approach -- Z-Clips from Lee Valley (click picture to visit their site)

Alternate approach — Z-Clips from Lee Valley (click picture to visit their site)

Then I started the process of sanding all of the details on the legs, skirts and stretchers.  This takes a long time, it’s mostly hand work with little pieces of sandpaper to shape and blend the details.  I have the skirts mostly done and still have work to do on the legs.  Probably two more hours before I’m ready to glue up the base.  I’m working everything up to 150 grit first, then I’ll go back over everything with 180, 220 and probably 320.  It makes a big difference to my eye.  The color of the sanded wood looks much lighter because it has sawdust in the pores, I’ll clean it between grits and wipe it with water to raise the grain (san scuff sand it again) before assembly.

Detailing the skirts -- one skirt is untouched and the other is done to 150 grit.

Detailing the skirts — one skirt is untouched and the other is done to 150 grit.

The other pair f skirts, also to 150 grit.

The other pair f skirts, also to 150 grit.

The BBQ Update

By the way, the pulled pork came our excellent.  It was on the smoker from 11:30pm Saturday night until 5:30pm Sunday (18 hours).  You want to putt it off when the internal temperature reaches 195 degrees.  I wrapped it in foil and let it rest an hour, then shredded it with a fork and tossed it with a little BBQ sauce.  The best way to serve it is on a bun with a scoop of cole slaw in my opinion, but my family doesn’t like slaw.  Tonight, as penance for the BBQ excess, I’m sticking with brown rice and tofu…

18 hours on the smoker, just in time for dinner

18 hours on the smoker, just in time for dinner

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Lotsa Details Done

Good day in the shop yesterday, although it was a close thing.  The third book in a trilogy I was reading came out recently, and when I get caught up in story the house could burn down around me without me noticing.  Luckily I finished the book with plenty of daylight left.

My goal this weekend is to get the Thorsen table as finished as I can.  I’d like to get it to the same state as the Thorsen cabinet I’m building so I can finish both pieces at the same time.  After wrapping up the piercings the day before, my next jobs were the cloud lifts in the skirts and the waterfall leg detail.  Both of these were pretty simple, mechanical tasks compared to the piercing.

First the cloud lift.  No real magic here, I made a simple MDF template with some scraps to locate the skirt and toggle clamps to hold it firmly in place.  I traced the outline of the lift detail onto the skirt and sawed away the waste, then pattern routed the part to clean it up.  I did a sample part to see if I could route all the way across, but as you would expect on the right side there the bit is cutting into the unsupported end grain it splinters.  Not a big deal, I just clean it up to the halfway point and flip the part in the fixture.

Pattern routing the cloud lift detail after sawing out the waste first

Pattern routing the cloud lift detail after sawing out the waste first

Then on to the waterfall legs.  I used the same approach here, but I had to make sure that I set the fixture up so that when it was made I would always be cutting “downhill” to avoid tear out.  I laid out some guidelines for where the steps on the waterfall would be, and routed them into the pattern in two steps.

First I set the fence on the router table so the bit protruded 1/8″ and set a stop block to allow the part to only reach the upper waterfall mark.  Note that these layout marks are on the back of the pattern, when it’s in use the waterfall detail will be on the right side of the pattern.

Making the waterfall pattern, step 1

Making the waterfall pattern, step 1

Now reset the fence so the bit extends 1/4″ and reset the stop block so it aligns the bit with the lower waterfall mark.

Lower waterfall step routed out

Lower waterfall step routed out

Next I used a rasp and some sandpaper to shape the  outside curves, after that it was just a patter of attaching the stop blocks and toggle clamps to the base.

Outside corners of the pattern rounded over

Outside corners of the pattern rounded over

Then I marked out the detail onto the legs in pencil and headed into the metal shop to bandsaw off the waste.  This detail only goes on the inside faces of the legs, and I was terrified that I’d lose track of what I was doing and put it on the wrong face.  You can bet I was very careful to triple check each leg before I sawed it.

Removing the waste on the legs

Removing the waste on the legs

Then I put the pattern to use, clamping each leg into place and using the router to make sure the steps were identical.

Pattern routing the step in the legs

Pattern routing the step in the legs

Once the steps were cut into the legs I set up a 1/8″ round over bit and went over all of the edges of the legs, the bottom edge of the skirts and the outside edges of the stretchers.  The bit can’t reach the stepped faces of the leg, so I used a rasp, file and sandpaper to shape those.

Leg after routing, but before hand shaping of the sharp edges

Leg after pattern routing, but before rounding over the sharp edges

Edges rounded over, these are the inside faces

Edges rounded over, these are the inside faces

Outside face

Outside face

I’m very close to being able to glue up the table base.  Everything needs to be finish sanded, and (OMG, I almost forgot!) I need to figure out how I’m going to attach the table top.  I guess I’ll make some wooden buttons and carve some slots in the side like this picture.  Wow, I can’t believe that almost slipped pass me.

Wooden buttons for attaching a table top (see https://www.finewoodworking.com/media/TabletopsFlat.pdf, click picture to read article)

Wooden buttons for attaching a table top (click on picture to read article)

Ok, so as I was saying…  Before I can glue up the base I have to make slots for attachment buttons, and finish sand everything.  I have the lower shelf already cut, I just need to rabbet the back and notch the corners to fit around the legs.  The wood for the top is prepared too, I have to make the breadboard ends and mortises for 16 ebony plugs though.  Sounds like a pretty full day ahead of me.

Legs awaiting sanding

Legs awaiting sanding

 

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